There was a funny guy tonight...........hope u dont let him in next time

Discussion in 'Ban Appeals and Complaints' started by prooi, 6 February 2013.

  1. prooi

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    Hi guys,

    just wanna report a player for a lot of rulebreaking,ive'd typed in game he has to stop,but he would'nt listnen
    after that he started with teamkilling on me and LAYZEE-SOD

    I don't care how many time i get killed in a game,but not by this way........i play for fun

    hope he get a ban for ever...thanks His name is 99Sniper99


    regards Prooi(Jack)
     

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  2. ThreeSix

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    Thx for the info prooi. If I see him online I will take care of him :)
     
  3. prooi

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    OK Threesix,

    he was a pain in the as...........is there any way to kick these guys while there is no admin in game
     
  4. lakaelo

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    no, only to leave a massage in chatbox.
     
  5. killroy

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    hallo prooi ook nederlander haha, nice dat je op ons forum bent gekomen
    dat je zo vaak bent ge tk is kut

    als ik online was geweest had ie al een ban gehad na de 2de keer haha

    maar goed dat je t gemeld hebt !!

    we kijken uit naar deze sukkel

    greets [email protected]
     
  6. prooi

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    Hoi Killroy,

    ja ook een Hollander,ongeveer 25 van Rotjeknor vandaan(Strijen)........ben jou nog niet tegengekomen in Bf2, i.i.g ik kan het niet voor me halen
    soms zijn er idd van die eikels die het spel verzieken als er geen admin is,erger me kapot aan die gasten en ik mag hopen dat hun pc een keer in brand vliegt.
    ik speel nu een jaar of 4,uit verveling en op aanraden van me neef heb ik dit spel aangeschaft
    4 jr geleden geopereerd aan me knie en een hele lange revalidatie er achteraan,verveelde me kapot en nu is er bijna geen dag dat ik niet speel
    ben 41 maar het blijft leuk....alleen vrouw en kinders worden wel is gek als ik zit te schelden op die rulebreakers.
    Hoe en wanneer kan je admin-rechten krijgen bij deze clan....kan ik zelf die eikels eruit knikkeren als er geen admin is...........k'hoor het wel van jou
    anders moet ik het weer in het engels doen.....en dat is'm niet echt...het praten gaat me beter af als typen,en moet er een tranlator aan te pas komen(lol)


    Gr Jack
     
  7. Loeft1

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    Hi Jack/Prooi,

    To answer some of the questions to a fellow Dutchy/Cloggy.
    All =NRU= trial and clan members have admin on our servers (BF2 and BF3) depending on what games you play. If you want to know more about joining us you can read it all here: http://noobs-r-us.co.uk/threads/9-Application-Guidelines-READ-before-applying!...
    Its all in English I'm afraid which brings me to my second point.
    =NRU= is a multinational but English based (battlefield)gaming clan, we have Swedes, Germans, Scottish cocks, some French, some other cloggies, and even some Yanks as members and I'm sure I have forgotten some. So the going language here on the forum and on the servers is gonna be English.
    However there are plenty of cocks that don't speak/read or write English all that well (mainly the Scottish cock again but who can blame them) and still seem to enjoy all the benefits and fun of the =NRU= membership. So don't hold back or be ashamed of fucking up the grammar, we all do... Some even seem to live by the Google translator! So give it all a go in English and if there are any questions or problems we can help you with there be plenty of people here that are willing to lend a hand.

    Have fun and maybe I'll catch you on the battlefield!

    Oh and I hope you knee keeps improving!
     
  8. samoz83

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    There is a Dutch translation of the forum at the bottom of the page (this only changes the forums system language and not actual user posts and not all words are translated but we can blame that on Loeft) ;)
     
  9. Rebirth

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    can't wait to become a nru member and to have some power on the servers :) it breakes my heart to see people play unfair on nru servers when there are no admins around.
     
  10. [cT*] 5h00fly

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    I would just like to point out, not all us Scottish cocks have poor grammar skills... just saying :D
    and us Scottish Cocks were here a lot longer than some of you

    SCOTS DANISH
    aff af
    alane alene
    bairn barn
    bane ben
    blae bleg
    blad blad
    brent braende
    claith klaide
    clart klatte
    coo ko
    cruik krykke
    cruisie kruse
    dook dykke
    drucken drukken
    efter efter
    forbye forbi
    fremmit fremmed
    gang gang
    gavel gavl
    greet graede
    grey-hairit graharet
    grue gru
    grund grund
    hals hals
    het hed
    hoose hus
    ken kunne, kende
    kilt kilte
    kirk kirke
    lang lang
    ligg ligge
    lirk lirke
    lowe lue
    mair mer
    moose mus
    oot ud
    reek rog
    rowan ron
    saip saepe
    sark saerk
    sang sang
    seck saek
    seik syg
    siccar sikker
    skaith skade
    skellum skaelm
    skelly skele
    smaa sma
    smiddy smedje
    smool smugle
    smit smitte
    soor syre
    starn, stern stjerne
    stane sten

    This list is not exhaustive : a Danish friend who visited Scotland some years ago for about ten days, made a list even in that short time, of over three hundred words common to both languages and pronounced the same or almost the same. What conclusions can we draw from these examples? The Danish words, like the Scots words, have a common Germanic ancestor as does Anglo-Saxon but the fact that these words exist in parallel in Scots and Danish in the present day while their English equivalents where they did once exist do not exist now, points to the divergent paths these languages have followed. Can we therefore say that English is just a dialect or just a corrupt form of the original? I think not. In the same way it is just as wrong to say Scots is just a dialect or a corruption of English. This comparison of Scots and Danish, superficial though it may seem, is surely sufficient to show that Scots has strong European roots and is not just an off-shoot of English.

    Other links can be made with other languages, such as French, through words that exist in Scots but not in English. This reflects the Auld Alliance and the fact that there were links between the royal houses of both countries, rather than the effects of conquest or takeover.

    SCOTS FRENCH
    arles arles
    ashet assiette
    aumry armoire
    bien bien
    braw brave
    douce doux, douce
    dour dur
    fash facher
    gigot gigot
    tassie tasse
    Dr J Derrick McClure in his excellent book 'Why Scots Matters' also points out the list of words Scots has acquired from Dutch, including the following, some of which will have a familiar ring to anyone from the North-East:-
    craig, cuit, dowp, bucht, farrow, heck, owsen, callant, doit, howff, redd and scone. Similarities between Scots and German and Scots and Norwegian can also be shown, including the famous "stursuker" (phonetic spelling) for "vacuum cleaner".
    Scots of course also has words that have come into it from our country's other language, Gaelic. Many place names and surnames show this connection as well as words such as the following brief selection:- glen, ben, loch, strath, clachan, kyle, ceilidh, banshee and boorach.
    Although Gaelic is now spoken only by 2% of the population as a first language, it is now being learned by many other Scots keen to enrich themselves culturally. Gaelic is also a language with European roots linked to other languages like Irish, Welsh and Breton.
    In this present day, when the European community is drawing together, part of its attraction is not the uniformity so many people dread as a consequence of centralisation, but the rich variety of cultures that is one of the means by which one country learns to respect another. If countries are to retain their own identity, they must retain their languages. Thus a plea for recognition of the Scots language as a medium for Scots culture is not an attempt to hang on to something that is outdated, but a way of affirming ourselves as twenty-first century Scots, a people with European roots.
     
    #10 [cT*] 5h00fly, 12 February 2013
    Last edited: 12 February 2013
  11. [cT*] 5h00fly

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    In the North of Europe there is a family of languages all of which bear certain resemblances to one another, most of which have been subject to each other's influences as well as those of other languages and all of which are consequently of a mixed character, as many languages are These are the Germanic languages, which in turn are only one of the groups of languages that form the Indo-European language map. English and Scots are two of these Germanic languages as are for example, German and Dutch, Norwegian and Danish. No one argues against the separate existence of any of these languages, except for Scots.

    What are the grounds for this argument? The most common one is that Scots is just a dialect of English. To anyone who knows anything at all about Scots, or language in general, this is manifestly absurd. First of all, Scots is not one dialect but several. Put a man from Wick, another from Aberdeen, a third from Perth, in a room with a Fifer, a Glaswegian and a Borderer, and see if they all speak the same dialect. They are just as distinct from one another as a Scouse, a Cockney, a Geordie, a man from Avon, Dorset or Devon would be. Yet Scots is the name applied to the way people speak everywhere north of the Tweed, which would seem in itself an admission that this is a separate language.
    Certainly it was not until the 15th century that the term Scottis was used for the language by Gavin Douglas and by that he meant the literary Scots he helped to forge out of the spoken language of the majority of the population, along with the other Medieval Makars who, like Geoffrey Chaucer in England, raised the status of the language they spoke to the position hitherto occupied by Latin. It had of course existed along with Norman French for some time, until the barons gave that tongue up in favour of the majority language. In calling it Scottis, Gavin Douglas was appropriating a term that had earlier had been used for the Gaelic of Scotland and Ireland. In an age of growing nationalism and the feeling of being one nation, however diverse within itself, one can see why Gavin Douglas chose to call his language by a name that the whole country had come to apply to itself. He obviously felt it was different from the language spoken over the Border in the country from which Scots under Bruce and Wallace had fought to free themselves two centuries earlier.
    In fact the Lowland tongue had been called Inglish and was derived from the Northumbrian dialect of the Anglo-Saxons heavily influenced by the Norse of the Vikings. In Scottish that influence was retained and can be demonstrated to this day, while in England it existed most strongly in the North and did not last to the same extent in standard English. This Norse-influenced Inglish formed the basis of the language later to become known as Scots. But, as languages always do in different places, it developed in a different way, was subject to different influences and was used to create a quite distinctive literature. For example there was a strong Gaelic influence on Scots which English did not receive. To be a separate language related to English as well as to Danish and German, makes Scots no different from other Germanic languages.

    Of course nowadays there is no Standard Scots in the way as there is Standard English. There is no standard Scots spelling, just a series of allowable alternatives based on dialectal variation. Efforts to recreate a literary Scots have not met with conspicuous success. The Lallans devised by writers of the 20th century Renaissance some of them great poets, all too often seems artificial and full of affectation to most Scots readers. It suffers from what I like to call the "ettle to jalouse" syndrome - that is the determination to use old Scots words at all costs, whether they sound natural or effective or not.
    However this may just be a characteristic of an early stage of development. For one thing is sure - one cannot create a literary language in a short space of time, any more than you can bring a Standard language into being by passing a law. It has to evolve and it may well be doing so in spite of the drawbacks noted. If Scots were to be used by the media, not all the time, but regularly as a normal practice; if schools and colleges were to treat Scots as an acceptable form of expression; if people in everyday life were to feel able to express themselves in Scots without feeling ashamed of it for any reason, then we might see the emergence of a Standard Scots. The fact that it does not exist at the moment is not an argument against bringing it about. There is also the equally mistaken theory that Scots is a "corrupted" form of English. This word carries with it a suggestion of inferiority that cannot be reconciled with the fact that our so-called "corrupted" language has from very early times produced a literature of the very highest quality, from the Medieval Makars to Hugh MacDairmid and beyond. The people who hold this viewpoint can never explain how the language came to be "corrupted" or even what exactly they mean by the word and why that makes it inferior. In linguistic terms of course, it is meaningless, but of course linguistic terms are not what these critics have in mind. What they are expressing are social and political prejudices that come from their blinkered view of their country in its European context. It is noteworthy that those who claim Scots is just a form of English are often the same people who say they cannot understand anyone who speaks Scots, even if it is only Scots-accented English. If it isn't all that different, why is it so hard to understand? If they can't understand it, perhaps it's because it has for example, so many Scandinavian words in it. I shall return to this point in due course.
    First, I want to denounce the poisonous racism inherent in the system by which generations of Scots have been taught to reject their own language. "Speak properly" has long meant for Scottish school-children "Speak English". This is a monstrous piece of cultural oppression and something I am glad to report our Universities and schools are beginning to banish from their curricula. To speak of the three I know about - there may be others - Professor Graham Caie of Glasgow University who significantly has experience of living and working in Denmark, devotes a considerable amount of time to teaching Scots, as does Professor Charles Jones of Edinburgh University, and Derrick McClure and Caroline Macafee at Aberdeen University. All this means we are likely to get more language teachers in our schools who know something about Scots. The Scots which students in these three Universities bring with them is accepted and studied instead of being regarded as something to be eliminated. But as I know from experience, those teachers who at present try to teach Scots language and literature in our schools are still up against barriers of prejudice and ignorance among teachers and parents. Often work with pupils is made more difficult by the influence of the home, as well as the ethos of the school, which may both be resolutely opposed to Scots.

    But to get people to understand that Scots is a living language to be proud of, one has to try to help them to grasp the nature of language itself, which is not so easy to do. Present day Scots is often described as "eroded" or "diluted", as if there were something unnatural about this. But it is part of a natural process, akin to that which affects the landscape. To say Scots is different from what it was one or two hundred years ago is of course true: a living language does not stay the same; it changes constantly, and you can't put the clock back or stop it. All languages evolve, losing words that are no longer needed and acquiring words for new ideas, inventions or purposes.
    On the other hand, it is true that Scots has suffered heavy blows to its development, from the publication of the Authorised Version of the Bible in English, to the moving of the royal court to London in 1603, to the Union of the Parliaments in 1707, since when Scots has been actively discouraged for political and social reasons, since it is no longer the language of law and government or of the more pretentious sections of society. The trouble is that the establishment has tried to disguise these political and social reasons as educational and linguistic ones. Scots have been given the impression by their teachers that there is something inherently wrong or inferior about their mither tongue and consequently it has had to be confined to the playground, the pub and the tartan variety show, the back lanes of Scottish life, rather than the main street. Fortunately this has not been fatal to it, but it did upset the continuity of our cultural development until MacDiarmid came along to raise it to the heights once more. In the meantime, Scots have had to become bi-lingual, which is not in itself either unusual or disadvantageous. The trouble is that Scots have also lost a sense of identity and the confidence that goes with it: that is what has been taken from us by the pernicious system that seeks to trample on the Scots language.
     
    #11 [cT*] 5h00fly, 12 February 2013
    Last edited: 12 February 2013
  12. [cT*] 5h00fly

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    What Is Scots?

    Many people have heard about the Scots language but aren't sure what it is. Scots has been spoken in Scotland for several centuries and is found today throughout the Lowlands and Northern Isles. The name Scots is the national name for Scottish dialects sometimes also known as ‘Doric’, ‘Lallans’ and ‘Scotch’, or by more local names such as ‘Buchan’, ‘Dundonian’, ‘Glesca’ or ‘Shetland’. Taken altogether, Scottish dialects are known collectively as the Scots language. Scots is one of three native languages spoken in Scotland today, the other two being English and Scottish Gaelic.

    Where is Scots spoken?


    Scots is mainly a spoken language with a number of local varieties, each with its own distinctive character. Scots is spoken in Aberdeen, Dundee, Glasgow, and Edinburgh as well as in the Borders, Dumfries and Galloway, central Scotland, Fife, the Lothians, Tayside, Caithness, the North East and Orkney and Shetland.


    Who speaks Scots?


    Scots is spoken by old and young alike and can be heard in both cities and country areas. People can have a strong emotional attachment to the language and often feel most comfortable using it amongst their family and friends. Because the Scots language was for a long time discouraged by officialdom and schools, many people who speak Scots will speak differently when talking to strangers or in formal situations, by mixing their language with English. Scots was the language used by Robert Burns to write much of his poetry. Today Scots is still used by poets and writers but the places you are most likely to encounter it are in people's homes, in the streets, and in the everyday life of communities. At the present time there are no Scots-medium programmes, but you will hear varying degrees of Scots used in TV programmes such as ‘Chewin the Fat’ or ‘Gary Tank Commander’, films such as ‘Sweet Sixteen’ and ‘Neds’.


    Some Scots words


    Here are some Scots words. You will hear them used all over Scotland. Aboot, bairn, bonnie, brae, cooncil, doun, dreich, faither, fitba, flit, glaikit, gowk, heid, hoose, ken, kirk, laddie, lang, lassie, mither, nane, poke, rare, scunner, speir, stooshie, stramash, threap, wean. People who speak Scots use these words and many other words like them.


    Other names for Scots


    There are lots of names for Scots dialects. You'll probably hear them used more often than the word Scots. These names are usually connected to a place and you may have your own local name for the way you speak. These local ways of speaking are called dialects. Taken altogether these dialects are called Scots.

    Scottish 'Slang'


    Sometimes people call the way they speak slang or Scottish slang. This is because, in past times, schools discouraged children from speaking the language by branding it ‘slang’. Often people say slang, but actually mean Scots, though they don’t know the name.


    Is Scots the same as speaking with a Scottish accent?

    Most Scottish people speak with a Scottish accent. People from Scotland and people from England, for instance, can both speak English, but each speaks with a different accent, which tells the listener where we come from. Speaking Scots is not the same as speaking English with a Scottish accent. This is because speaking in Scots means using many words, sayings, turns of phrase, meanings and grammar, found only in Scots.

    Where does it come from?

    The language originated with the tongue of the Angles who arrived in Scotland about AD 600, or 1,400 years ago. During the Middle Ages this language developed and grew apart from its sister tongue in England, until a distinct Scots language had evolved. At one time Scots was the national language of Scotland, spoken by Scottish kings, and was used to write the official records of the country. Scots was displaced as a national language after the political union with England, in 1707, but it has continued to be spoken and written in a number of regional varieties since that time.

    do you feel educated yet? or shall I carry on!! yesh!
     
    #12 [cT*] 5h00fly, 12 February 2013
    Last edited: 12 February 2013
  13. [cT*] 5h00fly

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    IN NO WAY DOES =NRU= CONDONE RACISM

    try practising what u preach m8

    just saying!! ;)

    xxx <3
     
    #13 [cT*] 5h00fly, 12 February 2013
    Last edited: 12 February 2013
  14. seaman-stains

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    lol @ leoft for his post good points well made coco lol

    and xxx xxx i fukin love you shoo xxx xxx lmao best posts i have read in almost 6 years lads
     
  15. Loeft1

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    LMFAO... my joke about English grammar must have struck a small nerve there ;-)

    I certainly expected Jim to reply but now I get 2 for the price of 1 (just how the Dutch like it BTW haha)
    Maybe the two of you should write a book about it, you half way there lol

    Scottish translation according to http://www.whoohoo.co.uk/main.asp :

    Lmfao... mah joke abit sassenach grammar main hae struck a wee nerve thaur ;-)
    i certainly expected jeem tae reply but noo Ah gie tae fur th' price ay yin (joost hoo th' dutch loch it btw haha)
    maybe th' tois ay ye shoods write a book abit it, ye half way thaur lol
     
  16. samoz83

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    What lol no southerner can understand that
     
  17. lakaelo

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    AW: Re: There was a funny guy tonight...........hope u dont let him in next time

    naw wan can understan´dis.

    just put this one in google translator:

    and i only got the message " u have broken google translator you git" :tbag:
     
  18. genozide

    genozide New Member

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    Nii ja loeftcock ei sitt voinu edes mainita meitä suomalaisia..translate that with google you fannies.
     
  19. lakaelo

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    google said: no mars language available lol
     
  20. samoz83

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    To be fair shoo can speak English unlike Jim and spoony :)
     
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